Cappuccino

May 30, 2007

There are many stories about the origin of the name, the most popular one is that the drink was invented by the Capuchin Monks. We leave the search in the library up to you.

A Cappuccino is steamed, foamed milk on top of the Espresso with a circle of crema around the foam. The ratio of milk, foam and Espresso are not 1 to 3 as many people may say it is. You should expect about one to two centimeter of foam in a 8 oz cup. However, it is up to the barista to decide the ratio’s. The foam should be a dense, shiny wet foam that does not have any visible bubbles.

Start by adding cold, fresh milk to a belly jug. Fill the jug between 1/3 and 1/2 full and use a thermometer. Start with foaming the milk, slowly lower the jug so you hear a high chirping sound, you should not see any bubbles appear. Keep doing this until you have enough foam and then start texturing, which will mix all the air with the milk. Turn off the steam when you reach 60 °C and your milk should finish at a perfect 65 °C.

Now leave the milk on the side and produce your Espresso. Whilst your Espresso is extraction start to spin the jug. This will mix all the foam back into the milk creating a lovely, glossy shine. Once you are happy with the look of the milk, slowly pour the foam in the center of the cup on top of the Espresso. Wiggle the jug from side to side with small movements from the wrist (not too quick) to let the foam flow out. Pour without the wiggle to get the milk in to cup.

Serve your Cappuccino with chocolate or cinnamon toppings.

Cappuccino

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